International Master in Auditing and Business Management

Program Presentation

The International Master in Auditing and Business Management (henceforth referred to as DDMIAGE) will acquaint the student with the fundamental principles of business management, accounting, financial statement analysis, and auditing. This knowledge is indispensable for any professional operating in 21st-century working environments, and will be complemented by a variety of topics that will allow the student to gain an overview of the modern-day business entity and master the statistical and mathematical tools that are a prerequisite for performing successfully in this area.

Set in an interactive context within a virtual learning environment, the educational methodology followed by the Programme is based on a pedagogical approach favouring both the acquisition of theoretical principles, and the analysis and discussion of practical case studies.

On successful completion of the International Master in Auditing and Business Management, the award holder will be able to:

  • Propose, design and implement auditing procedures in line with corporate necessities, ranging from the appraisal of internal control systems to the production of audit reports.
  • Become familiar with, master and apply the appropriate techniques for auditing the different areas within a company.
  • Draw up, understand and interpret the financial statements generated from corporate accounting data.
  • Master the techniques, instruments and tools that guarantee success within the process of economic and financial analysis.
  • Manage organisations from an integral and quality perspective. A modern approach in compliance with standards ISO 9001, ISO 14001 and OHSAS 18000 is advocated, wherein these standards are regarded as indispensable tools for corporate sustainable management.
  • Develop a battery of investigative skills specific to the corporate scenario (argumentative, interpretative, proactive, multidisciplinary, innovative and ethical), whose aim is to foment theoretical and methodological knowledge, especially in the field of auditing and business management.

Who is the programme for?

The DDMIAGE is aimed at professionals from a variety of backgrounds who wish to acquire the knowledge, skills and abilities necessary to carry out Auditing and Business Management.

This Programme will qualify successful participants to operate comfortably in a number of professional areas: business management, accounting, internal and external auditing, corporate direction, business advisory systems and company consultancy. By the end of the course, they will likewise be fully prepared to undertake research projects related to Management Science.

In essence, The International Master in Auditing and Business Management is designed for:

  • Economists, professionals related to the world of business (controllers, internal auditors, inspectors, risk analysts, financial managers, people in charge of management administration, planning and control, etc.) and for all those people interested in the subject.

Diploma

After successfully completing the Program, the student will receive a diploma issued by the university where they enrolled with the patronage of the Ibero-american University Foundation (FUNIBER).

Program Structure

The estimated length of the International Master in Auditing and Business Management program is 900 hours (90 credits)1.

Regarding the distribution of time, it is established that:

  • Since it is a distance program and not subject to physical classes, there is no specific start date so, the student can enroll at any time, as long as there are spaces available.
  • For academic or educational reasons, the Program has a minimum duration that in exceptional cases (for example subject validation) could be six months.
  • The maximum time available for the Program is 24 months. During this time, the student must have completed all assessments relating to the subjects, as well as the Final Master Project or Degree Thesis.

The credit structure of the International Master in Auditing and Business Management is listed in the following table:

  CREDITSa HOURS
1st Part: Business Management 18 180
2nd Part: Auditing: Quality, Environment and Prevention 11 110
3rd Part: Statistics and Finances 10 100
4th Part: Accounting, Financing and International Taxation 7 70
5th Part: Advanced Accounting  11 110
6th Part: Auditing 18 180
7th Part: Final Project or Degree Thesis 15 150
TOTAL 90 900

a. One (1) ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) credit is the equivalent of 10 hours of study. If students follow the Programme at a university which does not operate within the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) framework, this credit-hour weighting may vary.

Objectives

The main aim of the International Master in Auditing and Business Management is that of producing professionals with practical and up-to-date knowledge of accounting, the drawing up of financial statements and corporate auditing. Likewise, the Programme will develop the student's capacity for critical analysis and managerial decision-making within the framework of an integrated and systemic organizational model supported by the NICTs.

Specific Objectives:

Propose, design and implement auditing procedures in line with corporate necessities, ranging from the appraisal of internal control systems to the production of audit reports.

  • Become familiar with, master and apply the appropriate techniques for auditing the different areas within a company.
  • Draw up, understand and interpret the financial statements generated from corporate accounting data.
  • Master the techniques, instruments and tools that guarantee success within the process of economic and financial analysis.
  • Manage organisations from an integral and quality perspective. A modern approach in compliance with standards ISO 9001, ISO 14001 and OHSAS 18000 is advocated, wherein these standards are regarded as indispensable tools for corporate sustainable management.
  • Develop a battery of investigative skills specific to the corporate scenario (argumentative, interpretative, proactive, multidisciplinary, innovative and ethical), whose aim is to foment theoretical and methodological knowledge, especially in the field of auditing and business management.

Career Opportunities

Some of the career opportunities for the International Master in Auditing and Business Management are:

  • Auditor of annual accounts
  • Internal Auditor.
  • Accounting official.
  • Consultant
  • Business Consultant.

Study Plan

The program structure of the International Master in Auditing and Business Management Programme is divided into the following seven compulsory modules:

  • Module 1: Business Management (180 hours)

The first module allows the student to acquire an overall vision of the company from a social and relational perspective, in terms of both domestic and foreign clients.

The subjects and workload (in hours) that correspond to the first module are shown in the following table:

  • Module 2: Auditing: Quality, the Environment and Risk Prevention (110 hours)

The second module allows students to understand the process by which quality management systems are implemented within business organisations. It also presents auditing procedures as diagnostic tools for measuring the efficiency of the system.

The subjects and workload (in hours) that correspond to the second module are shown in the following table:

  • Module 3: Statistics and Finances (100 hours)

The third module provides a firm grounding in statistical and financial concepts. In addition, it enables the student to use effectively the most commonly employed auditing tools related to these areas.

The subjects and workload (in hours) that correspond to the third module are shown in the following table:

STATISTICS AND FINANCES
SUBJECTS HOURS
Basic statistics 30
Statistics Sampling 20
Financial Mathematics 20
Financial Management 30
TOTAL 100
  • Module 4: Accounting, Financing and International Taxation (70 hours)

The fourth module allows students to understand the basic principles of taxation from an international perspective, and familiarises them with the international standards related to financial accounting and financial information.

The subjects and workload (in hours) that correspond to the fourth module are shown in the following table:

ACCOUNTING, FINANCING AND INTERNATIONAL TAXATION
SUBJECTS HOURS
Financial Valuation for the IAS 30
International Accounting Standards 30
International Taxation and Financing 10
TOTAL 70
  • Module 5: Advanced Accounting (110 hours)

In the fifth module, students will acquire further expertise in accounting and will become acquainted with the tools that will prove essential for the subsequent analysis of each of the areas subject to audit.

The subjects and workload (in hours) that correspond to the fifth module are shown in the following table:

  • Module 6: Auditing (180 hours)

The sixth module enables the student to understand the various stages of audit performance, from initial planning to the production of the audit report.

The subjects and workload (in hours) that correspond to the sixth module are shown in the following table:

  • Module 7: Research Methods and Master's Degree Final Project (150 hours)

In the seventh and final module, students are required to carry out an in-depth research study in which they will apply the knowledge and competencies acquired during the entire Programme to a specific research topic. The subject Research Methods will prove invaluable for the successful completion of the Master’s Dissertation in that it familiarises the student with the use of the scientific method and its corresponding research tools.

RESEARCH METHODS AND MASTER'S DEGREE FINAL PROJECT
SUBJECTS HOURS
Research Methods 50
Master’s Degree Final Project 100
TOTAL 150

Description of the Subjects

  1. STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES

    This subject will enable students to establish a conceptual and methodological framework from which they will be able to identify the systemic and strategic approach employed by present-day Human Resource Management (HRM).

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES
    Description of the current approach to strategic management of human resources. Identification of models of human resource management that favour a systemic and strategic approach.
    HRM
    Technology for diagnosis, prediction and monitoring. Design of technology for the diagnosis, prediction and monitoring of human resource management. Application of tools and techniques in the creation of HRM technology.
    STRATEGIC PLANNING IN HR AND STAFF OPTIMISATION
    Interpretation of the integrated and systemic approach on which strategic planning of human resources is based. Workforce optimisation and determination of staffing requirements in the light of key tangible and intangible performance indicators.
  2. BUSINESS ETHICS AND CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

    Students will become acquainted with the fundamental principles of the subject matter, thus enabling them to appreciate the importance and relevance of Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility, while being encouraged to consider them an efficient tool in the attainment of competitiveness. On completion of this subject, students will have gained a sound understanding of the concept and intrinsic value of ethics and social responsibility, in addition to becoming familiar with ethical standards and the role they play in corporate efficiency. The relationship between business ethics, values, competitiveness, efficiency and effectiveness will be studied so as to enable the student to be capable of determining lines of corporate action that favour an ethical and responsible approach.

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS ETHICS AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
    Historical evolution of ethics. Universal nature of ethics. Influential thinkers in the field of ethics. Definition of ethics. Methods of study. Reasons for acting intelligently. Need to take into account the interests of others. Ethical performance, a corporate perspective. Ethical standards and business efficiency. Fundamental principles of business ethics. Life plan requirements. Ethics, legality and values. Shared values. Reasons for the growing interest in business ethics.
    THE NEED FOR BUSINESS ETHICS AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
    The concept of business and society. Predicament of Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs). The company as a system and integrated part of society. Business Ethics. Ethics and competitiveness. Corporate Social Responsibility, company priorities and mission. Sustainable company management. Responsibilities towards clients, employees and other stakeholders. Ethics training as a prerequisite for establishing a more secure business climate. Benefits derived from adherence to a firmly established code of ethics. Consequences of an inadequate use of ethics within organisations.
    THE PIVOTAL ROLE OF THE HUMAN FACTOR IN BUSINESS ETHICS AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
    People as a source of income rather than expenditure. Evolution of human capital and intellectual capital. Business culture, motivation, sense of belonging, and leadership. Ethical variables in the performance of a business community. Synthesis of organisational climate, communication and authority systems in the determining of ethical values. Business Ethics and current trends in management. Innovation, science and technology. Ethics and ecommerce.
  3. OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT AND DIRECTION

    This subject familiarises the student with practices involved in the management of operations and logistics, including strategic aspects related to long-term decision-making, like product design and definition (What can we offer?) and process design and analysis (How can we achieve this?), as well as short- and mid-term tactical and operational planning decisions (How many? How? Where should we offer the product?). Emphasis is laid on the importance played by logistics support in the execution of a viable plan. In this sense, logistics is approached as the most efficient means of meeting requirements at the lowest feasible cost.

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    PRODUCTION SYSTEM DESIGN
    Forecasts. Production Planning and Control. Synchronised Production Systems.
    SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT
    Logistics system management. The supply chain. Importance of logistics and the supply chain. Logistics costs. Logistics as a service. Global supply and distribution chains. Strategic role of logistics and the supply chain. Logistics and the supply chain in the generation of value. Strategies in logistics and supply chain management. Logistics and supply chain planning. Areas of logistics planning.
    PURCHASING AND SUPPLY MANAGEMENT FUNCTION
    Objectives and relevance of the purchasing function and its interaction with the rest of the company. Strategic Planning in the purchasing function. Analytical model of purchasing processes.
  4. LOGISTICS

    This subject will enable the student to understand and contextualise logistics within the area of operational organisations and thus successfully manage product acquisition, movement and storage, in addition to mastering inventory control.

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK OF LOGISTICS
    Logistics systems management. The supply chain. Planning.
    INVENTORY MANAGEMENT
    Definition and types of inventory. Performance measurement of inventory systems. Inventory costs. Inventory distribution by value. Inventory Systems.
    WAREHOUSE MANAGEMENT
    Overview of warehouse management. Criteria. Packaging.
    PROCUREMENT
    Objectives of the purchasing function. Procurement strategic planning. Analytical models.
  5. E-BUSINESS AND ITS INTEGRATION IN CORPORATE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

    This subject provides a comprehensive overview of the concept of business integration via information systems. It approaches integration from an organisational and technological perspective and reviews the key concepts of integration based on ICTs such as ERP, SCM and CRM.

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    ORGANIZATIONAL APPROACH TO INTEGRATION: SUPPLIES, CLIENTS AND SYSTEMS
    Fundamental principles. Value chain. Case study of Supply Chain Integration.
    TECHNOLOGICAL APPROACH TO INTEGRATION: CONCEPTUAL ASPECTS OF E-BUSINESS INTEGRATION
    Importance of e-business. Organisational change. Company strategy. e-Business implementation.
    ENTERPRISE RESOURCE PLANNING (ERP)
    Conceptual aspects. Integration in information management. Integration of ERP systems. Supplier selection. Strategic impact on investment return.
    HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IN THE DIGITAL ERA
    Change within a corporate environment. Human resource management. Technology in human resource management.
    SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT (SCM)
    The supply chain. Definition. Supply Chain Management. Implementation of SCM in e-business.
    CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT (CRM)
    Conceptual aspects. Strategy. Implementation. Supplier selection. Integration.
  6. QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS: ISO 9001 AND AUDITING

    Employing an eminently practical approach, this subject is of particular relevance to those suppliers who need to implement a quality management system, whether in response to client request or as a result of the need to comply with the legal requirements existing in the sector.

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS
    Presentation of the Quality Management Systems. The ISO 9000 series of standards. The eight quality management principles. Process management and control. Differences between product standards and management systems. Implementation plan for a quality system. Sector-specific management systems. Global review of the implementation of the ISO 9001 standard.
    WORKING WITH THE ISO 9001 STANDARD
    Good documentation practices. Documentation requirements of the ISO 9001:2008 standard. Computerised documentation management. Certification process. Scenario post ISO 9001.
    QUALITY AUDITING
    Objectives of quality auditing. ISO 19011:2002 standard. Fundamentals of auditing. Management of an audit programme. Audit activities. Auditor competence and evaluation. Audit questionnaire.
    APPENDICES
    Correspondence between ISO 14001:2004 and ISO 9001:2008. Guidelines as to documentation requirements. List of national accreditation bodies (IAF members). Rules for the use of the certification marks QMS and EMS. List of IQNET partners.
  7. OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY ASSESSMENT SERIES: OHSAS 18001

    This subject seeks to enable students to identify corporate obligations in terms of occupational health and safety, and to be capable of applying appropriate techniques for occupational risk control with a view to achieving efficient staff management within the area of risk prevention.

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    INTRODUCTION TO THE CONDITIONS OF WORK AND HEALTH
    Brief introduction to occupational health and safety. Relation between work and health. Working environment. Work-related injuries. Fundamental principles of Industrial Hygiene. Specific Techniques employed in occupational risk control. Prevention vs. Protection.
    ACCIDENTS AND SAFETY AT WORK
    Definition of accident. Employee well-being: differences between accidents in the workplace and other health threats. Definition of occupational disease. Cost of workplace accidents and occupational diseases. Prevention costs.
    STUDY OF POSSIBLE PREVENTION TECHNIQUES
    Risk assessment: definition of risk assessment; risk analysis and valuation; alternatives and methods for risk assessment. Safety inspection: definition of safety inspection; safety inspection phases. Accident investigation: definition of accident investigation; methods of accident inspection. Statistical analysis of accident occurrence: statistical indexes of accident rates.
    MANAGEMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY
    Integration of preventive measures in the overall corporate management framework. System of risk prevention management. Models of risk prevention management. Standard OHSAS 18001:2007. Cycle of continuous improvement. The OHSAS 18000 series of standards. Structure of standard OHSAS 18001:2007. Requirements of standard OHSAS 18001:2007.
  8. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS: ISO 14001

    This subject presents Environmental Management Systems (EMS) as tools that organise and regularise corporate procedures related to environmental issues associated with company activity. Furthermore, the student will receive a clear and illustrative explanation as to the steps necessary for successful implementation of this environmental management instrument, which favours the protection of the environment and reduces the barriers involved in international trade.

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    BUSINESS AND THE ENVIRONMENT
    Environmental protection measures: reduction in the consumption of energy, water and raw materials, adequate waste management, sewage treatment, smoke and noise, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), compliance with the legal obligations implicit in practices affecting the environment, implementation of an EMS in the company. Normalising environmental practices.
    CORPORATE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS
    Definition of an EMS. Function of EMS and reason for implementation. Who can implement an ESM? Interested parties in an EMS. Approach to EMS implementation. Choice of EMS. Global review of the implementation of the ISO 14001 standard.
    STANDARD ISO 14001
    The ISO 14000 series of standards. Structure of the ISO 14001 standard. Definitions. Objectives and scope of ISO 14001: requirements, decision and initial commitment, initial environmental review, environmental policy, planning, implementation and operation, verification. Review by Management. Certification of EMS in accordance with ISO 14001. Total quality and environmental management.
    CASE STUDY: A DIDACTIC STUDY OF IMPLEMENTATION
    Precedents: case of RICOTE, S.A. Problem statement. Stage 1: environmental commitment. Stage 2: initial review. Stage 3: RICOTE, S.A. draws up its environmental policy. Planning of Environmental Management System. Drafting of manual: procedures. Checking and corrective action. Auditing.
  9. BASIC STATISTICS

    This subject provides the student with practical knowledge of the basic concepts of descriptive statistics, probability and inferential statistics.

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS
    Univariate statistics. Mean, mode and median. Variance, standard deviation and other measures of dispersion and location. Multivariate statistics. Correlation between variables. Covariance.
    GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATIONS
    Bar and pie charts. Box-plots. Histograms.
    PROBABILITY AND INFERENTIAL STATISTICS
    Probability calculation. Bayes' theorem and the law of total probability. Statistical distributions. Inference. Point estimate.
    CONFIDENCE INTERVALS
    Construction and interpretation.
  10. STATISTICAL SAMPLING

    This subject provides the student with practical knowledge of the sampling methods currently available to auditing professionals. It also presents the procedures for the selection and determination of sample sizes.

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    SIMPLE RANDOM SAMPLING (SRS)
    LINEAR SYSTEMATIC SAMPLING (LSS)
    PROBABILITY PROPORTIONAL TO SIZE (PPS) SAMPLING
    MULTI-STAGE SAMPLING
    TWO-PHASE SAMPLING
    OBTAINING A SAMPLE
  11. FINANCIAL MATHEMATICS

    This subject introduces the student to the area of financial valuation, laying special emphasis on the corresponding valuation laws.

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    FINANCE LAWS
    Introduction to the world of finance. Capital comparison. Finance laws: compliance requirements.
    FINANCE LAWS IN USE
    Simple capitalisation. Compound capitalisation. Comparison of capitalisation laws. Commercial discount. Rational discount. Compound discount. Comparison of discount laws.
    INTEREST RATES
    Annual interest rate. Nominal interest rate. Fractional annual interest rate.
    VALUATION OF BASIC FINANCIAL INCOME
    Types of fixed income (annuities): lifetime, temporary, immediate, deferred, in advance, in arrears. Arithmetic growth annuity. Geometric growth annuity.
    TREASURY BILLS, BONDS AND OBLIGATIONS
    Issue. Redemption. Payment of interest or arrears.
    LOANS
    Annuity, depreciated capital, interest and outstanding debt. French loan. Constant payment loan. American loan.
    INTEREST RATES
    Implicit and forward interest rates
  12. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

    This subject highlights the main aspects that constitute the financial management area of any business entity.

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    THE COMPANY AND CORPORATE FINANCE
    The financial function of a company. The financial objective of a company. Corporate financial structure. Finance and economic health of the company. Corporate finances and financial strength. Economic and financial trajectories. Financial management and financial statements. Financial management and normalisation of financial and accounting conditions.
    FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AS ANALYSIS SUPPORT
    Management relevance of economic and financial statements. Basic balance equation. Profit and loss account.
    ANALYSIS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
    Analysis of operating profit (EBIT). Benefits After Tax (BAT) accounting. Net profit (NP). Integrated CPG analysis. Analysis of analytical CPG.
    ANALYSIS OF CORPORATE OPERATIONAL PROFITABILITY
    Operational profitability. Economic profit (EP). Policies derived from EP. Financial profit (FP). Policies derived from FP. Financial leverage factor.
    ANALYSIS OF THE MANAGEMENT OF WORKING CAPITAL
    The business operating cycle. Analysis of working capital turnover. Stock inventories. Minimum investment in working capital. Imbalances in stock management. Stock control systems.
    ANALYSIS OF OPERATIONAL LIQUIDITY
    Liquidity and financial strength. Analysis of corporate liquidity. Calculation of working capital requirements. Management of commercial credit provision to clients. Impact of commercial risk. Credit management of suppliers. Stock valuation.
    ANALYSIS OF THE COST-EFFECTIVENESS OF THE FINANCIAL STRUCTURE
    Cost of capital structure. Methods for calculating the cost of equity. Weighted average cost of capital (WACC). Shareholder value creation.
    ANALYSIS OF INVESTMENT DECISIONS
    The decision to invest. Profile of an investment plan. Calculation of absorbed cash flow. Calculation of generated cash flow. Economic and financial attributes of an investment plan. Methods of economic assessment of an investment plan.
    ANALYSIS OF THE COST-EFFECTIVENESS OF INVESTMENT PLANS
    Net asset value (NAV) method. Internal rate of return (IRR) method. Comparative analysis of NAV and IRR. Pay-back period method. Calculation of financial cash flow. Economic risk factors in investments.
  13. FINANCIAL VALUATION UNDER IAS

    The International Accounting Standards (IAS) require the compulsory application of certain standards of financial valuation with a view to maintaining adequate accounting records. Students will receive practical tuition to enable them to apply these valuation standards correctly, employing Excel as an accounting tool.

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL VALUATION
    VALUATION OF CAPITAL CASH FLOWS
    VALUATION OF INVESTMENT PROJECTS
    VALUATION OF LOANS
    FINANCIAL VALUATION IN THE NATIONAL CHART OF ACCOUNTS
  14. INTERNATIONAL ACCOUNTING STANDARDS

    In this subject the student will become familiar with the International Standards of the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB), their philosophy and main applications.

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    DIVERSITY OF ACCOUNTING APPROACHES WORLDWIDE
    ACCOUNTING HARMONISATION
    THE IASB AND INTERNATIONAL ACCOUNTING STANDARDS
    FIRST IMPLEMENTATION
    FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
    INTANGIBLE ASSETS
    REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS
    TANGIBLE FIXED ASSETS
    CURRENT ASSETS
    FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS
    PROVISIONS AND CONTINGENCIES
    NET WORTH
    INCOME AND DETERMINATION OF FINANCIAL RESULT
    PROFIT TAX
  15. FINANCING AND INTERNATIONAL TAXATION

    Globalisation presents business entities with investment and financing opportunities on an international scale. In order to carry out successful investments, it is essential to be familiar with the different financial instruments with which the investment may be achieved (or through which financing may be obtained), as well as the way in which these transactions will be taxed.

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    THE INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL SYSTEM AND THE EUROMARKETS
    The World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. The International Financial Markets. The Euromarkets. Other forms of international financing.
    CURRENCIES, EXCHANGE RATES AND FOREIGN EXCHANGE
    Importance of exchange rates. Long-term exchange rates. Short-term exchange rates. Expected return. Exchange rate hedging: currency futures and options.
    INTERNATIONAL TAXATION
    Importance of taxation in decision-making within Multinationals. Taxation types and rates. Tax jurisdiction. Tax treaties and tax credit.
    TRANSFER PRICING
    Multinationals and transfer pricing. Reasonable transfer pricing. Fiscal monitoring and control of transfer pricing.
  16. ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

    The main aim of this subject is to acquaint the student with the concepts of analysis and diagnosis of financial statements. It will present the relevant analytical techniques and procedures so as to enable the student to make an informed opinion about the patrimonial, financial and economic state of the entity under analysis. This approach seeks to provide students with sufficient expertise so that, through analysis of the accounting data and application of the corresponding methodology, they may be capable of making an accurate diagnosis of the current economic and financial state of the business entity and its future prospects.

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    BASIC FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
    SUPPLEMENTARY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
    INTRODUCTION TO THE ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL
    STATEMENTS
    STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS
    LIQUIDITY ANALYSIS
    SOLVENCY ANALYSIS
    ECONOMIC ANALYSIS
    PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS
    SECTORAL ANALYSIS OF THE COMPANY
    DIAGNOSTIC OVERVIEW OF THE COMPANY
  17. MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING

    This subject seeks to provide the student with sound, practical knowledge of corporate internal accounting. It commences by defining the scope of Management Accounting and explaining its interface with Financial Accounting. Issues related to the classification, location and assignment of cost for the determination of manufacturing costs will also be studied. Taking the costs calculated as a reference point, they will be used to guide the taking of informed corporate decisions that will contribute to the efficient use of productive resources.

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    BASIC CONCEPTS OF COST ACCOUNTING
    RESOURCE COSTS
    INTERNAL ACCOUNTING CYCLE
    PROCESS OR DEPARTMENT COST ACCOUNTING
    PRODUCTION ORDER OR JOB ORDER COST ACCOUNTING
    ACTIVITY-BASED COST (ABC) ACCOUNTING
    FULL AND PARTIAL COST ACCOUNTING
  18. TOTAL QUALITY COSTS

    This subject will comprehensively review the existing extensive bibliography related to the area of Total Quality Costs. The most significant conceptual aspects will be broached so as to provide the student with the necessary expertise to be able to quantify the Total Quality Cost.

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    THE IMPORTANCE OF QUALITY COST AS A MANAGEMENT INSTRUMENT
    Justification of quality cost. Historical relevance of total quality cost.
    CONCEPTUAL ANALYSIS OF QUALITY COST
    Terminological conflicts. Definition of total quality cost. Composition of total quality cost: classifications.
    INTEGRATION OF TOTAL QUALITY COST INTO MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING PROCEDURES THROUGH ACTIVITY-BASED COST SYSTEMS.
    Introduction to activity-based cost systems. Relationship between activity and added value. Symbiotic relationship between ABC systems and total quality cost.
    QUANTIFICATION OF TOTAL QUALITY COST THROUGH CUSTOMER COMPLAINTS
    Introduction to the advocated approach. Complaint valuation as an approach to total quality cost.
    ANALYSIS AND COMMUNICATION OF TOTAL QUALITY COST
    Importance of adequate data analysis. Recommended comparative bases. Analysis of total quality costs.
  19. BUDGETARY AND PUBLIC ACCOUNTING

    This subject will enable the student to interpret public accounting statements, especially the budget.

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    PUBLIC ECONOMICS AND MANAGEMENT
    Public economics and public sector. Public choice theory. The welfare state. International public economics. Fundamentals of public management. Political economy of public sector governance. Budget processes and fiscal discipline. The budget as a tool of economic policy. Budgeting, accounting and control of public management.
    BUDGETING
    Budget concept and history. Budget concepts.
    BUDGETING TECHNIQUES
    Practical application of budgeting. Budget benchmarking techniques. Multi-annual budgeting. Budgeting: specific case analysis.
    COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF INTERNATIONAL BUDGET COMPOSITION
    Trends in expenditure composition in Europe. Evolution of public expenditure. Trends in expenditure composition in Latin America. Evolution of public expenditure. Trends in expenditure composition in the United States. Evolution of public expenditure.
    PUBLIC ACCOUNTING
    Concepts of public accounting. Accounting data systems for public bodies.
    IMPLICATIONS OF THE INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS GOVERNING PUBLIC ACCOUNTING AND BUDGETING
    IAS, IFRS and ISA: International Accounting Standards (IAS); International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS); International Standards on Auditing (ISA).
  20. AUDIT PLANNING AND PERFORMANCE

    This subject will initially familiarise students with the standard principles of auditing by presenting the most widely accepted auditing standards together with a basic outline of the phases inherent to audit procedure. Subsequently, the basic methods of audit planning and administration will be studied, from the moment the client requests the service to the drawing up of the auditing program.

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    CONCEPT OF AUDITING
    Types of audit. Scope of auditing.
    REQUIREMENTS TO BECOME AN AUDITOR
    Responsibilities of the auditor.
    ANNUAL ACCOUNTS AUDITING
    Mandatory audits.
    STANDARDS ISSUING BODIES
    Auditing standards. Concepts and types.
    AUDITING PHASES
    Basic, practical concepts.
    AUDIT WORK PHASES
    Basic outline of audit work. Development of work phases.
    AUDIT PLANNING
    Concept. Objectives. Factors in planning audits.
    THE AUDIT PROGRAM
    Content. Preparation. Types.
  21. INTERNAL CONTROL

    This subject will enable students to evaluate the internal control system of a business entity and reflect their findings in an internal control memorandum.

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    CONCEPT AND OBJECTIVES OF INTERNAL CONTROL
    Types of Internal Control. Key elements.
    PHASES OF INTERNAL CONTROL
    Evaluation of internal control systems. Analytical techniques.
    PREPARATION OF THE CONCLUSION MEMORANDUM OF INTERNAL CONTROL
    Internal control weaknesses.
    LIMITATIONS
    Limitations inherent to internal control.
  22. AUDITING DOCUMENTATION, EVIDENCE AND RISKS

    All auditing activities must be thoroughly documented. "Working papers" is the widely used term given to the set of records generated by an audit and on which auditors base their reports. Students will learn how every auditing action should be duly documented at the relevant stage of each audit.

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    DEFINITION AND PURPOSE OF WORKING PAPERS
    TYPES OF WORKING PAPERS
    Permanent and temporary preservation of archival material.
    GENERAL AUDIT PROGRAM
    Organisation and documentation of programs and working papers.
    CONTENT OF WORK CELLS
    GUIDELINES FOR THE USE OF WORKING PAPERS
    AUDIT EXECUTION
    Pre-audit study, customer analysis. Preliminary phase. Closing phase. Events subsequent to closing.
    AUDIT REVIEW
  23. AUDIT PROCEDURES BY AREAS I

    Once the auditing process has been plotted, the auditor divides the work involved in the review of the annual accounts into different areas. This is done to assure a clear understanding and recording of all the actions taken. For each area the auditor should be familiar with the corresponding accounting standards, and should set the targeted objectives. In addition, the main aspects of internal control to be reviewed should be decided upon so as to implement the appropriate auditing procedures. The study of these areas is shared between two subjects, the first of which will concentrate on non-current assets, stock inventories, trade debtors and creditors.

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    AUDITING OF NON-CURRENT ASSETS: INTRODUCTION
    Tangible fixed assets: accounting valuation, recording and information; auditing objectives; internal control; auditing procedures. Intangible assets: valuation, recording and accounting data; auditing objectives; internal control; auditing procedures.
    STOCK INVENTORIES: INTRODUCTION
    Valuation, recording and accounting data. Initial valuation. Methods of stock valuation. Subsequent valuation. Information subject to disclosure in financial data. Auditing objectives. Internal control. Auditing procedures.
    TRADE DEBTORS AND OTHER ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE: AUDITING OBJECTIVES
    Internal control. Auditing procedures.
    TRADE CREDITORS AND OTHER ACCOUNTS PAYABLE: AUDITING OBJECTIVES
    Internal control. Auditing procedures.
  24. AUDIT PROCEDURES BY AREAS II

    In the second part of the subject, the student will become familiar with financial instruments, whether assets or liabilities, as well as with the profit and loss account of the business entity.

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS (ASSETS)
    Recognition, recording and appraisal of financial investment. Loans and accounts receivable. Held-to-maturity investments. Financial assets at fair value. Available-for-sale financial assets. Reclassification of financial assets. Derecognition of financial assets. Specific cases of financial assets. Auditing of short- and long-term financial investments. Auditing objectives. Internal control. Auditing procedures.
    AUDITING CASH AND OTHER LIQUID ASSETS
    Auditing objectives. Internal control. Auditing procedures.
    FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS (LIABILITIES)
    Debt rating. Debts and payables. Trading portfolio. Liabilities at fair value. Accounting valuation, recording and information. Auditing objectives. Internal control. Auditing procedures.
    AUDITING OF PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNTS
    Accounting valuation, recording and information. Auditing objectives. Internal control. Auditing procedures.
  25. AUDIT REPORTS

    This topic starts with the auditing of the area of previous assets, which constitutes the last step prior to issuing the audit report. Subsequently, students receive a concise presentation of other auditing areas of lesser importance. Finally, information is provided as to the conclusions drawn from the fieldwork and the considerations that should be taken into account for future audits in the business entity. In addition, the student will become acquainted with other key aspects, such as the need to discuss adjustments and reclassifications with the entity's management, and familiarity with audit report templates (in compliance with prevailing auditing standards and internal control report templates), which present the audit findings together with recommendations for improving internal corporate procedures.

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    NET WORTH (EQUITY) AUDITING: EQUITY CAPITAL
    Accounting valuation, recording and information. Auditing objectives. Internal control. Auditing procedures.
    OTHER AUDITING AREAS: PROVISIONS AND CONTINGENCIES
    Auditing of related parties. Subsequent events and continuous auditing.
    AUDIT REPORT: ELEMENTS OF THE AUDIT REPORT
    Types of auditor's opinion.
    AUDIT REPORT TEMPLATES
  26. RESEARCH METHODS

    This subject seeks to familiarise students with the scientific context of research, and the field's conceptual considerations and methodological requirements. The different stages intrinsic to a process of research will be examined, thereby favouring the development of the skills and abilities involved in the methodological design of the Master's Degree Final Project and in the writing of the research report.

    Aspects which are addressed within this subject include:

    EPISTEMOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH.
    What is epistemology? What is a paradigm? Knowledge and science. Positive-empirical approach. Hermeneutic or interpretive approach. Poiesis and praxis: key elements to the understanding of paradigms.
    SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH PROCESS.
    Steps in scientific research. Initiating a research project. Project starting point. Choice of research topic. Problem formulation. Formulating research questions. Hypothesis formation. Research justification. Titling of research.
    CONSTRUCTION OF THE THEORETICAL RESEARCH FRAMEWORK.
    Definition of theoretical framework. Review of related literature: documentation and information gathering. Search sources: primary, secondary and tertiary. Search location: virtual and/or physical. In-depth literature consultation: selection criteria. Reading of academic texts: strategies for reading and understanding written texts. Reproducing/understanding a text in the right measure. Practical advice for the reading of academic texts. Research data recording procedures. Writing of research framework: guidelines.
    DESIGN OF RESEARCH STRATEGY.
    Determination of type of research design. Classification variables. Operational definition of variable. Sampling methods. Tools and techniques for gathering data. Participant observation. Nominal group. DELPHI technique. In-depth interview. Group discussion. Life history. Data analysis procedures. Qualitative data analysis. Content analysis. Discourse analysis.
    THE RESEARCH REPORT.
    Parts of a written research report. Presentational aspects in scientific research studies. Composition of written texts: the writing process. Textual issues. Basic text properties. International styles of bibliographical referencing. General rules for in-text citation. Bibliographical referencing at the end of the research study. Criteria for self- assessment of a research report.
  27. FINAL PROJECT

    Although this module occupies the last place in the Programme Overview, work on the Master's Degree Final Project will commence on completion and favourable assessment of the subjects that precede it on the learning schedule (after completion of approximately 66%), as detailed in the Programme's Virtual Campus. These subjects include Research Methods, which will prove essential for the successful writing of the Final Project.

    The procedural information for the Final Project is contained in the Final Project Guidelines, available from the Virtual Campus. The guidelines are divided into three parts, with their corresponding phases, and constitute the guide the student should follow to achieve satisfactory completion of the Final Project.

    During this whole process, the student will receive support from academic staff and will be assigned a Final Project Supervisor who is an expert in the field of study.


NB: The content of the learning programme may undergo minor modifications to account for ongoing curricular updating.

Management

European University of the Atlantic (UNEATLANTICO)

  • Dr. Rubén Calderón Iglesias
    Doctor in Economics from Antonio de Nebrija University, Spain. Chancellor of the European University of the Atlantic.

Ibero-American University Foundation (FUNIBER)

  • Dra. Silvia Aparicio.
    Doctora en Ciencias Económicas por la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid y Licenciada en Administración y Dirección de Empresas por la Universidad de Cantabria. Directora Académica Internacional del Área de Desarrollo Directivo, Organización Empresarial y Recursos Humanos de la Fundación Universitaria Iberoamericana, FUNIBER.
  • Dr. José Antonio Trigueros Pina 
    Doctor in Economics. Dean of the Faculty of Social and Legal Sciences. Miguel Hernández University of Elche, Spain.
  • Dra. Cristina Hidalgo González
    Senior Lecturer in the Department of Applied Economics. University of León, Spain.
  • Dra (c). Carmen Lilí Rodríguez Velasco
    Doctoral candidate in Education, Ibero-American International University. Master in Occupational and Organizational Psychology from the University of Havana, Cuba. International Academic Coordinator for the Area of Management Development, Business Organization and Human Resources, FUNIBER.
  • Msc. Mauricio Pulgarín Osorio
    Master in Economic and Financial Administration from the Technological University of Pereira, Peru. Academic Coordinator of the Master in Auditing and Business Management and Specializations, FUNIBER.

Teaching staff and Authors

  • Dr. Manuel Enrique Sansalvador Sellés. Doctor in Economics. Vice-Dean of the Faculty of Social and Legal Sciences. Miguel Hernández University of Elche, Spain.
  • Dr. José Antonio Cavero Rubio. Doctor in Economics. Senior Lecturer. Miguel Hernández University of Elche, Spain.
  • Dr. Mª. Margarita González Benítez. Lecturer in the Department of Engineering Projects. Politécnica University of Catalonia (UPC), Spain.
  • Dr. Santos Gracia Villar. Doctor in Industrial Engineering. Lecturer at the Politécnica University of Catalonia (UPC), Spain.
  • Dr. Javier Reig Mullor. Doctor in Economics. Dean of the Faculty of Social and Legal Sciences of Orihuela. Miguel Hernández University of Elche, Spain.
  • Dr. José Francisco González Carbonell. Doctor in Economics. Vice-Chancellor of Academic Staff. Miguel Hernández University of Elche, Spain.
  • Dr. David Barrera Gómez. Doctor in Engineering from the Politécnica University of Catalonia (UPC). MBA from the University College of Industrial Engineering (UPC), Barcelona. Consultant specializing in business, technology and corporate solutions. Lecturer at the Ibero-American International University.
  • Dr. Eduardo García Villena. Doctor in Project Engineering: Environment, Safety, Quality and Communications, from the Politécnica University of Catalonia. Academic Director of the Department of Environment at the Ibero-American International University.
  • Dr. (in process) Diana Patricia Cortés Díaz. Doctoral candidate in Project Management, Ibero-American International University. Master in Human Resources and Knowledge Management from the University of León, Spain. Consultant specializing in Labour and Social Security Law. Programme Coordinator and Lecturer, FUNIBER.
  • Dr. (in process) Andrea Gutiérrez Jiménez. Doctoral candidate in Project Management, Ibero-American International University. Master in Human Resources and Knowledge Management from the University of León, Spain. Programme Coordinator and Lecturer, FUNIBER.
  • Dr. (in process) Carmen Lilí Rodríguez Velasco. Doctoral candidate in Education, Ibero- American International University. Master in Occupational and Organizational Psychology from the University of Havana, Cuba. International Academic Coordinator for the Area of Management Development, Business Organization and Human Resources, FUNIBER.
  • Dr. (in process) Daniela Torrico Villarroel. Doctoral candidate in Project Management (Marketing research), Ibero-American International University. Master in Business Administration from La Salle. Master in Marketing and Commercial Distribution from the Politécnica University of Catalonia. Programme Coordinator and Lecturer, FUNIBER.
  • Dr. (in process) Lina Pulgarín Osorio. Doctoral candidate in Project Management, Ibero- American International University. Master in Integrated Management: Prevention, Environment and Quality from the Politécnica University of Catalonia. Programme Coordinator and Lecturer, FUNIBER.
  • Dr. (in process) María Eugenia Luna Borgaro. Master in Human Resources and Knowledge Management from the University of León, Spain. Expert in Human Resource Management and Management Skills. Lecturer, FUNIBER.
  • Dr. (in process) María Fernanda Figueroa.Doctorate candidate in Project Management, Ibero- American International University. Master in Strategic Sport Management (Marketing, Finances and Taxation Management in Sport Entities) from Universitat de Barcelona. Programme Coordinator and tutor, FUNIBER.
  • Mr. Francisco Menargues García (BSc). President of the Alicante Association of Economists. Economist, Accounts Auditor, ROAC Member (Official Register of Accounts Auditors), Corporate Advisor and Consultant.
  • Ms. Bienvenida Beneyto Gonzálvez. Bachelor's Degree in Law. Corporate Advisor and Consultant.
  • Mr. Juan Reche Segovia. Bachelor's Degree in Economics. Coordinator of the Department of Planning, Management and Budgetary Accounting at Miguel Hernández University of Elche, Spain.
  • Ms. Antonia Isabel Durá Maciá. Bachelor's Degree in Business Administration. ROAC Member (Official Register of Accounts Auditors). Master in Auditing and Business Management from Miguel Hernández University of Elche, Spain.
  • Mr. Antonio Ortiz Aragó (BSc). Actuary and Statistician.
  • Ms. Silvia María Fajardo Sebastián (BSc). Actuary and Statistician.

FUNIBER Training Scholarships

The Iberoamerican University Foundation (FUNIBER) periodically delivers an economic baseline with extraordinary character for FUNIBER scholarships.

To apply for it, you only need to send your application for a scholarship on the website’s main page with the required data, and the evaluation committee will examine the suitability of your candidature to be granted economic aid, in the form of a FUNIBER scholarship.